The six different types of fire extinguishers are water, foam, CO2, powder, water mist, and wet chemicals. Each type is suitable for a certain class of fires. For example, Powder is used to fight Class A (wood) fires; while CO2 extinguishers are good for Class B (flammable liquids) and C (electrical equipment). It’s important to know which type your business needs before purchasing any!

when purchasing a fire extinguisher you should make sure it is the right type for your business

There are six different types of fire extinguishers: water, foam, CO², powder, water mist, and wet chemicals. Each type has a specific use case-for example only powders should be used on Class A fires that involve wood or paper products. When purchasing an extinguisher make sure it suits the surroundings and also the building.

In the event of a fire, you’ll want to know which type will best combat it. Water extinguishers are perfect for Class A fires that involve wood and paper products while CO² extinguishers work well on Class B (flammable liquids) and C (electrical equipment).

It is important to be able to differentiate each type so you know which to use when an emergency arises.

Water fire extinguishers are perfect for Class A fires that involve wood and paper products while CO² extinguishers work well on Class B (flammable liquids) and C (electrical equipment). It is important to be able to differentiate each type so you know which one to use when an emergency arises.

-Water extinguishers are perfect for Class A fires that involve wood and paper products while CO² extinguishers work well on Class B (flammable liquids) and C (electrical equipment).

-It is important to be able to differentiate each type so you know which one to use when an emergency arises.

When you are choosing a place for your fire extinguisher, be sure to find a place that is easily accessible and out of reach from children.

-The location for your fire extinguisher should also allow you the time necessary to get there in case an emergency arises.”

“Water Extinguishers are perfect for Class A fires that involve wood and paper products while CO² extinguishers

you need it to be in a secure and visible place that is easily accessible if an emergency arises.

-Wet Chemical Extinguishers are the most expensive, and best for Class F fires (kitchen grease) because they use a foam that clings to surfaces.”

“Water Extinguishers are perfect for Class A fires that involve wood and paper products while CO² extinguishers you need to be in a secure and visible place that is easily accessible if an emergency arises. Wet Chemical Extinguishers are the most expensive, and best for Class F fires (kitchen grease) because they use a foam that clings to surfaces.”

if your fire extinguisher becomes damaged make sure to have it checked for safety and replaced.

-Foam Extinguishers are best suited for Class B fires (flammable liquids) because they blanket the liquid surface to prevent re-ignition”

“When using any fire extinguisher, make sure you read all instructions before use. If your fire extinguisher becomes damaged or is not operating properly refer to this article on how to inspect a fire extinguisher.”

Powder Extinguishers also have different types: Dry Chemical Powder and Wet Chemical Powder. The dry type of powder is usually used in large spaces like warehouses while wet chemical powders work well in smaller rooms that do not need as much coverage.” “If the starter fluid gets ignited by an emergency such as a fire then make  sure that the area is well ventilated to prevent toxic fumes from accumulating in a confined space.”

“The following are some common types of fires and what fire extinguisher type would best combat them: “

-Water Extinguishers work for Class A, B, and C Fires. Fire involving cooking oils like grease or animal fats should be extinguished by foam because it can solidify in contact with water. In any case where you’re not sure which class your fire falls under just go ahead and use water as a safe bet.”

-CO² works best on electrical equipment such as an outlet or fixture that has been sparking while other dry chemical powders may cause secondary damage to electronics when they come into contact with them.